Answers: IPv6 Static Route 2

certskills
By certskills July 27, 2016 09:10

 

Static IPv6 routes may seem like a bigger challenge than static IPv4 routes at first. Configuring static IPv6 routes, however, can really help you learn those basic routing concepts. Check out the lab requirements, get some reps in, and solidify your knowledge of how IPv6 routing works.

Answers

Figure 1: Four Routers and Five Switches

Example 1: R1 Config

 

Example 2: R2 Config

 

Example 3: R3 Config

 

Example 4: R4 Config

 

Commentary

When configuring static routes, it is important to ensure that you have all of the correct IP subnet information because just a small difference in subnet mask can make a big difference in routing behavior.

For this lab, you were tasked with configuring static routes between the routers so that each of their LANs would be able to route packets to each other. Because there are four different routes in this topology, this means that there will be three remote LAN subnets that need to have routes configured per router.

For R1 the three remote LAN subnets are: 2002::/64, 2003::/64 and 2004::/64. The first route would be for R2’s LAN subnet. R1 and R2 both connect to the subnet between the routers (the 2000::/64 subnet) and R2’s IPv6 address on this subnet is 2000::2, making this address the next-hop address in the static route. The complete command to configure this static route would be be ipv6 route 2002::/64 2000::2.

Note that the ipv6 route command could have used a link-local address as the next-hop address. However, the lab specifically asked you to use global unicast addresses instead of link local addresses as the next-hop address.

R1’s second static route, for the subnet off R3’s G0/2 interface, would use R3’s IPv6 address on this shared LAN of 2000::3. The complete command to configure this static route would be be ipv6 route 2003::/64 2000::3.

R1’s third and final route would a route to the subnet off R4’s G0/2 interface. R1’s next-hop address would be R4’s IPv6 address on the central LAN (2000::4). The complete command to configure this static route would be ipv6 route 2004::/64 2000::4.

The routes configured on R2, R3, and R4 follow similar logic. On all of the routers, the route for 2001::/64 (off R1) points to R1’s 2000::1 address as the next-hop address. On all routers, the route for 2002::/64 (off R2) points to R2’s 2000::2 address as the next-hop address. On all routers, the route for 2003::/64 (off R3) points to R3’s 2000::3 address as the next-hop address. And you guessed it, on all routers, the route for 2004::/64 (off R4) points to R4’s 2000::4 address as the next-hop address.

Answers: PAP 1
SNMPv2c Secured with ACLs
certskills
By certskills July 27, 2016 09:10
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3 Comments

  1. JSAV August 29, 09:59

    Does a default route for each router work too in clockwise fashion? 🙂 I know its less efficient because of hops, but quicker to configure

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