CCNA Packet Tracer Labs – CCNA Vol 1, Chapter 8

certskills
By certskills November 7, 2019 09:05

The CCNA 200-301 exam includes the same VLAN and VLAN trunking concepts, configuration, and verification found in the CCNA exams for most of their history. However, this version of the exam chooses to ignore VLAN Trunking Protocol (VTP) – a choice that I personally like. The chapter and examples keep somewhat centered, with topics on creating and verifying VLANs on each switch, and with configuring VLAN trunks to connect multiple switches.

Confused? New to “Packet Tracer Labs for OCGs”?

The big idea is pretty simple: Repeat the Examples in the Official Cert Guide as part of your lab practice for CCNA using Packet Tracer.

The details require some reading. To get your head around what kind of content is here in the blog for these labs, read:

Book: CCNA 200-301 OCG, Volume 1
Chapter: 8
Title: Implementing Ethernet Virtual LANs
Part: 3

What’s in This Post

Chapter Intro: A brief description of the topics in that chapter of the book.

Download Link: Links to a ZIP; the ZIP holds all the .PKT files for this chapter.

Table of PKT files, by Example: A table that lists each example in the chapter, with the files supplied for each. Also lists a note about whether the PKT topology matches the book example exactly or not.

Tips: When we build the files, we come across items that we think might confuse you when trying the examples with PT. We write those notes in this section!

Chapter Intro

Chapter 8 of the CCNA 200-301 Official Cert Guide, Volume 1 focuses on Virtual LANs. VLANs allow a network engineer to separate the ports on a switch into multiple LAN broadcast domains – VLANs. By definition, in a layer 2 switch, a broadcast frame arriving in a port in one VLAN will be flooding out the ports in that VLAN, but purposefully not forwarded out ports belonging to other VLANs. VLANs give engineers a way to logically (aka virtually) break the switch into multiple logical switches.

The chapter’s examples focus on two main topics: VLANs and VLAN trunks. As usual, some examples detail configuration, while others focus on verification. The early part of the chapter focuses on VLAN configuration and verification, while the latter part of the chapter focuses on VLAN trunks.

Download the Packet Tracer ZIP File

One .PKT File – But Maybe Two (Duplicate) Toplogies

When building the content for this post, we review the examples in the book and decide whether it makes sense to supply a Packet Tracer (.pkt) file to match the example. If we choose to support an example by supplying a matching .pkt file, the .pkt file includes a topology that matches the example as much as possible. It also includes the device configurations as they should exist at the beginning of the example.

In some cases, the .pkt file shows two instances of the lab topology – one above and one below. We include two such topologies when the book example includes configuration commands, for these purposes:

  • Top/Initial: The topology at the top has the configuration state at the beginning of the example.
  • Bottom/Ending: The topology at the bottom adds the configuration per the example, so that it mimics the configuration at the end of the example.

Table of .PKT Files, by Example

 

Example .PKT Includes Initial State of Example?
.PKT Also Includes Ending State of Example?
Exact Match of Interface IDs?
8-1 Yes No Yes
8-2 Yes Yes Yes
8-3 Yes No Yes
8-4 Yes Yes Yes
8-5 Yes No Yes
8-6 Yes Yes Yes
8-7 Yes Yes Yes
8-8 Yes Yes Yes
8-9 Yes No Yes
8-10 Use 8-9 No Yes
8-11 Not Supplied Not Supplied N/A
8-12 Not Supplied Not Supplied N/A
8-13 Not Supplied Not Supplied N/A

Tips

This example works as intended in Packet Tracer. However, we added some description commands to the interfaces as notes for you, so the output in PT will list those description commands, while the example text in the book does not.

The output of the show vlan id 2 in real gear includes both access ports in that VLAN plus any VLAN trunks that allow the VLAN’s traffic. PT instead lists only the access ports in that VLAN. As a result, in this case, the example includes trunk port G0/1 in the output, while PT does not.

PT does not support the show interfaces interface-id trunk command, a command that is shown in the example. Consider instead using the show interfaces interface-id switchport command.

Your Options with the Two CCNA 200-301 Books: Volume 1 and 2
certskills
By certskills November 7, 2019 09:05
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1 Comment

  1. Christiaan Steenkamp November 8, 14:50

    Thank you Sir.

    I found this via twitter btw. You can plug your blog more often then even more people will find your work.

    Reply to this comment
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