Analyzing IP Networks Exercise 2

certskills
By certskills June 22, 2012 07:00

Here are a few more extra practice problems to help you learn how to analyze class A, B, and C networks. Today’s post lists sample problems, the follow-up post will show the answers.

Related links:

Five Problem Statements

Each problem starts with a Dotted Decimal Notation (DDN) number. Your job:

  • Determine the class (A, B, C, D, E, or none)
  • If A, B, or C:
    1. Find the Network ID
    2. Find the Network Broadcast Address
    3. Find the numerically lowest and highest IP addresses that can be used by hosts in the network

Table 1 lists the five problems.

Table 1: Five Problems for Today’s Post

DDN Value Class
1 9.9.9.9
2 99.99.99.99
3 199.199.199.199
4 119.119.119.119
5 229.229.229.229
Analyzing IP Networks – Answers, Exercise 1
Analyzing IP Networks – Answers, Exercise 2
certskills
By certskills June 22, 2012 07:00
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8 Comments

  1. anand June 22, 09:32

    1– network address 9.0.0.0 host 9.1.1.1-9.255.255.254 broadcast address 9.255.255.255 class A
    2–network address 99.0.0.0 host 99.1.1.1-99.255.255.254 broadcast address 99.255.255.255 class-A
    3–network address 199.199.199.0 host 199.199.199.1-199.199.199.254 broadcast address 199.199.199.255 class-C
    4–network address 119.0.0.0 host 119.1.1.1- 119.255.255.254 broadcast address 119.255.255.254 class-A
    5- is class-D so no addresses for host only 229.229.229.229 for network address

    I hope this is right answer wendell…

    Reply to this comment
    • Wendell Odom of Certskills June 26, 01:34

      Hi Anand,
      Perfect!

      Reply to this comment
      • kiril May 11, 02:37

        mr. Odom can you tell me why when i type the arp command to see the ip in my network show me in the and of list sometimes 2 or 3 or more ip from
        class d what represend this ips ?

        Reply to this comment
        • CCENTSkills May 14, 15:52

          Hi Kiril,
          Well, IPv4 multicasting is a pretty big topic to answer within a short blog post and answer. But to that one specific question… to send an IPv4 packet out an Ethernet interface, a host will encapsulate the packet in an Ethernet frame. That frame has a destination MAC address, of course. That ARP entry, although not actually learned with ARP, lists the destination MAC address that the host would use when building the frame. Note that the last 23 bits of the MAC address match the last 23 bits of the IP address, although it’s not always easy to see, given that the IP and MAC are in decimal and hex, respectively.
          Hope this helps!
          Wendell

          Reply to this comment
    • Wendell Odom of Certskills June 27, 03:09

      Whoop.s. No, #2’s range begins 99.0.0.1. I was using a small screen at the time – at least that’s my excuse for not noticing. 😉
      Wendell

      Reply to this comment
      • CyberGeekUS July 11, 23:53

        Wendell I think there are more missing ‘Whoops No’ on your last comment about Anand answer not only the one you pointed for answer #2:

        #1 – usable host IP addresses range begins on 9.0.0.1 NOT on 9.1.1.1
        #4 – usable host IP addresses range begins on 119.0.0.1 NOT on 119.1.1.1
        #4 – broadcast address is 119.255.255.255 NOT 119.255.255.254

        CyberGeekUS

        Reply to this comment
      • Wendell Odom of Certskills July 12, 06:47

        Well, I should’ve taken my time a little more. CyberGeekUS’s edits are indeed correct. Also, check the answers in the linked post. Apologies to all!
        Wendell

        Reply to this comment
  2. Chris September 25, 12:07

    Good Exercisesss

    Reply to this comment
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